Myblog's Fishing Tips and Tricks

Marine News Fall 2004 – Endangered and Threatened in Florida

Posted in Uncategorized by makelargps on December 11, 2009

Our oceans are home to many marine mammals, fish, turtles, corals and others. The delicate balance between man and the ocean is constantly being challenged by the demands of our society. Most of our planet is covered by water, a necessary ingredient of human life. The state of our oceans should be uppermost in our minds in order for quality of life for all species to remain as it is.

Florida’s West Indiana Manatee-What is Killing Them? The top manatee story after the recent hurricanes was in Lee County where residents rescued a manatee that was the victim of Hurricane Charley’s storm surge. The stunned and tired manatee was splashed onto Pearl Street after the storm surge receded. This was one manatee that did not have to be included in the mortality numbers this year.

The manatees killed this year are divided into categories by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission. 1/1/04 – 9/30/04 numbers: Watercraft-60, Flood Gates-1, Other human-4, Perinatal-65, Cold-36, Natural-20, Undetermined-43, Unrecovered-2 for a total of 231.

According to the February 2004 count of manatees in Florida by the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission there were only 2568 manatees remaining in Florida.

If you see a dead or injured manatee or one that’s been harassed while in Florida, please call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s toll-free hotline at 1-888-404-FWCC.

Lastly, as a visitor to our tropical paradise, do not approach, touch, feed or water manatees. It is against the law and carries a fine as well as a possible jail term. Use your camera to make memories, not a police experience.

Dolphins – Our favorite Marine Mammal. Dolphins are not endangered at this time, but the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 requires you to stay away from them. Do not encourage them into the path of danger by boats or other human interaction. Wild dolphins have been found injured by firecrackers placed down their blow hold, beer poured over them and into their blow hold and other horror stories. These beautiful creatures think man is their friend but the next person they meet may be their enemy instead.

There are licensed facilities where you can interact safely with dolphins that have been raised in captivity or rescued.

Sea Turtles-Has the 2004 hurricane season hurt their recovery? South Florida is home to Loggerheads, Leatherbacks and Green sea turtles. Hawksbill and Kemp’s ridley have occasionally been found. These are the five species found in US waters in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. The population of loggerheads nesting along the Atlantic coast of Florida is the second largest in the world. The nesting season runs from around May to September and within approximately 60 days of nesting, the hatchlings too are in danger.

It is too soon to have counts, but the yearly numbers will reveal the losses. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will be reporting the 2004 figures early next year.

There are other dangers to our sea turtles. The turtle hospital in Marathon, Florida treats a variety of turtle ailments, such as flipper amputations caused by fishing line and trap rope entanglements, shell damage caused by boat collisions, and intestinal impactions caused by ingestion of foreign material such as plastic bags, balloons and fishing lines. Turtles love jellyfish and shrimp and ingest filters from cigarettes and plastic in error. Turtles that died from starvation were found with a stomach full of cigarette filters.

The most recent nesting totals for Florida’s turtles from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission for the year 2003 is:

Loggerheads: 63,446

Green Turtles: 2262

Leatherbacks: 842

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP THE SEA TURTLES?

1. Never throw litter on the beach or in the water.

2. If pets are allowed on the beach, keep them leashed at all times.

3. Obey all beach rules and stay away from turtle nesting sites.

4. Help spread the word about sea turtles. The more people know, the more they will want to help them.

5. Watch for turtles while boating.

6. During nesting seasons, turn lights facing the beach off or have proper filters.

7. Participate in local beach and reef cleanups.

8. Do not buy sea turtle products-jewelry, oil, leather, meat or eggs.

Kathy Runk has been a volunteer exhibit guide at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, volunteer for the Save the Manatee Club in Florida, attended Dolphinlab in Marathon, Florida and adopted Elsie the manatee, dolphins Merina and her baby Calusa. Kathy is the owner of http://www.myoceantreasures.com that sells ocean themed jewelry and gifts.

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Do You Know How To Clean A Fish?

Posted in Uncategorized by makelargps on November 26, 2009

Now that you have caught your dream fish, do you know how to clean?

Good job. You must be so proud of yourself. You have just landed the biggest fish of all. How do you clean it? You certainly don’t want those ugly fish scales all over your wife’s clean kitchen. Now? what to do. What about cleaning the fish before you leave your fishing spot.

You will need a great knife to start with-a fish fillet knife. Spread out some old newspaper. Use a fish scaler or knife and work against the grain of the scale. Once all the scales are removed, you can toss the newspaper and rinse the fish.

Now it gets even messier. Do you know how to gut the fish? The less mess the better. Take your knife with the blade pointed toward the fish’s head, poke the stomach and slit the fish moving the fillet knife towards the fish’s head. Do not cut deep.

Secondly, take the fish fillet knife with the blade pointing toward the fish’s tail and open the stomach. Remove all the fish guts.

Thirdly, remove the gills and lastly, wrap up the messy newspaper and toss. There you have it. A perfectly cleaned fish.

Why Do You Need a Tacklebox?

Posted in Uncategorized by makelargps on November 23, 2009

A tacklebox or a tackle bag is a necessity to store your fishing lures, bobbers, and hooks.

A tacklebox is a necessity to store your expensive lures. The more you fish the more expensive lures you will accumulate. I can’t imagine over time having a tangled mess of barbed metal to contend with. Nothing beats staying organized. Therefore, having a tacklebox is a must.

So the question remains what type of tackle box do you need? There are many different types of tackleboxes to choose from. I suggest a tackle box with sufficient storage for your current needs then double it. Also to keep in mind your tacklebox should have sufficient compartments to hold some oversized lures. You wouldn’t want the oversized lures to tangle maps, leaders, or bandages.

What should you include in your tacklebox?

Bandage strips contained in a water-resistant container

Matches sealed in a water-resistant container

Suntan lotion

Flashlight and spare batteries

Spare car key in a small case attached to a large colorful bobber. (Hint: The bobber has to be large enough so that the small case does not sink).

For the salt-water enthusiast, tackle bags may be a practical alternative to tackle boxes. These tackle bags have plastic cylinders inside to hold saltwater lures. As well, the tackle bags have side compartments for leaders.

Although the tackle bags are convenient, remember not to lay your tackle bag on the sand as the tide can sweep up your tackle bag and take it to unknown places along with your expensive saltwater lures and your car keys. Or may have the unfortunate fate of having your tackle bag run over by a four-wheel drive vehicle or a dune buggy. Yes, this can happen.

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